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The legendary “island of apples” where [[Arthur, King of the Britons|King Arthur]] (a 6th-century incarnation of [[El Morya]]) was taken after being mortally wounded by his bastard son, Modred, at Camlan. Placed on a barge with “three queens,” the king drifted toward Avalon where, as Tennyson wrote, “falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies deep-meadow’d, happy, fair with orchard lawns and bowery hollows crown’d with summer sea....” From this “island valley” of Avalon, Arthur is expected to return as the “once and future king” (''rex quandam rexque futurus''). In Celtic mythology, Avalon refers to the Island of Blessed Souls—an earthly paradise located in Western seas.
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The legendary “island of apples” where [[King Arthur]] (a 6th-century incarnation of [[El Morya]]) was taken after being mortally wounded by his bastard son, Modred, at Camlan. Placed on a barge with “three queens,” the king drifted toward Avalon where, as Tennyson wrote, “falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies deep-meadow’d, happy, fair with orchard lawns and bowery hollows crown’d with summer sea....” From this “island valley” of Avalon, Arthur is expected to return as the “once and future king” (''rex quandam rexque futurus'').  
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In Celtic mythology, Avalon refers to the Island of Blessed Souls—an earthly paradise located in Western seas.
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== See also ==
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[[Arthur, King of the Britons]]
    
== Sources ==
 
== Sources ==
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{{POW}}, vol. 24, no. 35.
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{{POWref|24|35}}

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