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The striking use of color was not Veronese’s only gift to Renaissance art. Paul saw beauty as the most powerful catalyst for enlightenment, and he endowed the figures of Jesus, the apostles and saints with lifelike expressions. By associating them with easily identifiable places and things, he put them within the reach of the common people.
 
The striking use of color was not Veronese’s only gift to Renaissance art. Paul saw beauty as the most powerful catalyst for enlightenment, and he endowed the figures of Jesus, the apostles and saints with lifelike expressions. By associating them with easily identifiable places and things, he put them within the reach of the common people.
 
   
 
   
With fresh perspective, he approached serious and sacred subjects with a simple familiarity that shattered the idolatry inherent in previous medieval and Renaissance painting—an idolatry which had separated the common people from God and his saints and oppressed them with a sense of their own sin. Veronese opened the world of the holy to all, portraying it with a delight and a sense of mirth.  
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With fresh perspective, he approached serious and sacred subjects with a simple familiarity that shattered the [[idolatry]] inherent in previous medieval and Renaissance painting—an idolatry which had separated the common people from God and his saints and oppressed them with a sense of their own sin. Veronese opened the world of the holy to all, portraying it with a delight and a sense of mirth.  
    
In his ''Annunciation'', for example, the Virgin Mary is greeted by a beautiful, shimmering-robed [[Archangel Gabriel]], while her dog trots out to investigate the heavenly being. His ''Marriage of St. Catherine'' shows two angels in the lower left corner apparently disputing a book of scripture—vying with Catherine’s mystical ceremony for the viewer’s attention.  
 
In his ''Annunciation'', for example, the Virgin Mary is greeted by a beautiful, shimmering-robed [[Archangel Gabriel]], while her dog trots out to investigate the heavenly being. His ''Marriage of St. Catherine'' shows two angels in the lower left corner apparently disputing a book of scripture—vying with Catherine’s mystical ceremony for the viewer’s attention.  
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But Veronese—in his expression of refined innocence, of joy and the sweeping grandeur of the celestial—reached an apex of artistic and spiritual insight that helped catapult Western art beyond the heights of the Renaissance.  
 
But Veronese—in his expression of refined innocence, of joy and the sweeping grandeur of the celestial—reached an apex of artistic and spiritual insight that helped catapult Western art beyond the heights of the Renaissance.  
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[[File:Paolo Veronese bust at his grave.JPG|thumb|upright|alt=caption|Bust of Paolo Veronese above his tomb]]
    
== The ascension of Paul the Venetian ==
 
== The ascension of Paul the Venetian ==
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[[File:Paolo Veronese bust at his grave.JPG|thumb|upright|alt=caption|Bust of Paolo Veronese above his tomb]]
      
Near the close of his earthly life as the Venetian artist, he was advised by his guru, that he, Paolo, had earned his release from the schoolroom of earth and was ready to enter the realms of immortality. In 1588, Paolo contracted a fever and, after a few days of illness, died on April 9. His brother and sons buried him in San Sebastiano, where a bust was placed above his grave.  
 
Near the close of his earthly life as the Venetian artist, he was advised by his guru, that he, Paolo, had earned his release from the schoolroom of earth and was ready to enter the realms of immortality. In 1588, Paolo contracted a fever and, after a few days of illness, died on April 9. His brother and sons buried him in San Sebastiano, where a bust was placed above his grave.  
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Here, at the [[Château de Liberté]], after his passing and yet prior to his ascension, Paul began the most important of his works,'' The Holy Trinity''. The canvas has the unprecedented distinction of conveying the vibrations of both dimensions of activity—the earthly and the heavenly—for the canvas was completed after his ascension.  
 
Here, at the [[Château de Liberté]], after his passing and yet prior to his ascension, Paul began the most important of his works,'' The Holy Trinity''. The canvas has the unprecedented distinction of conveying the vibrations of both dimensions of activity—the earthly and the heavenly—for the canvas was completed after his ascension.  
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[[File:Veronese-Triomphe de Venise.jpg|thumb|alt=The Triumph of Venice|''The Triumph of Venice''. In an unsurpassed demonstration of contrasting color, Veronese draws the viewer’s eye from the glowing ambers below to the translucent blues and mother-of-pearl skies which frame the Lady Venice. Plush clouds and marble pillars unite heaven and earth. The perspective of the ceiling painting is tilted from bottom to top so that the foreground quarrel of armored knights, horses, and trumpets is downplayed and the viewer’s eye is irresistibly drawn along the swirling columns upwards to the coronation of Venus. Veronese’s use of pastel shades here, as in the coral-robed angel bearing the crown, also accentuates the heavenly event more than the dimmer browns and grays of the harsh scene below.]]
    
== A reflection on his life by the ascended master ==
 
== A reflection on his life by the ascended master ==
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[[File:Veronese-Triomphe de Venise.jpg|thumb|alt=The Triumph of Venice|''The Triumph of Venice''. In an unsurpassed demonstration of contrasting color, Veronese draws the viewer’s eye from the glowing ambers below to the translucent blues and mother-of-pearl skies which frame the Lady Venice. Plush clouds and marble pillars unite heaven and earth. The perspective of the ceiling painting is tilted from bottom to top so that the foreground quarrel of armored knights, horses, and trumpets is downplayed and the viewer’s eye is irresistibly drawn along the swirling columns upwards to the coronation of Venus. Veronese’s use of pastel shades here, as in the coral-robed angel bearing the crown, also accentuates the heavenly event more than the dimmer browns and grays of the harsh scene below.]]
      
The master Paul has spoken of his own artwork as Paolo Veronese:  
 
The master Paul has spoken of his own artwork as Paolo Veronese:  
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<references />
 
<references />
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[[Category:Heavenly beings]]
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[[Category:Embodiments of ascended masters]]

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