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The striking use of color was not Veronese’s only gift to Renaissance art. Paul saw beauty as the most powerful catalyst for enlightenment, and he endowed the figures of Jesus, the apostles and saints with lifelike expressions. By associating them with easily identifiable places and things, he put them within the reach of the common people.
 
The striking use of color was not Veronese’s only gift to Renaissance art. Paul saw beauty as the most powerful catalyst for enlightenment, and he endowed the figures of Jesus, the apostles and saints with lifelike expressions. By associating them with easily identifiable places and things, he put them within the reach of the common people.
 
   
 
   
With fresh perspective, he approached serious and sacred subjects with a simple familiarity that shattered the idolatry inherent in previous medieval and Renaissance painting—an idolatry which had separated the common people from God and his saints and oppressed them with a sense of their own sin. Veronese opened the world of the holy to all, portraying it with a delight and a sense of mirth.  
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With fresh perspective, he approached serious and sacred subjects with a simple familiarity that shattered the [[idolatry]] inherent in previous medieval and Renaissance painting—an idolatry which had separated the common people from God and his saints and oppressed them with a sense of their own sin. Veronese opened the world of the holy to all, portraying it with a delight and a sense of mirth.  
    
In his ''Annunciation'', for example, the Virgin Mary is greeted by a beautiful, shimmering-robed [[Archangel Gabriel]], while her dog trots out to investigate the heavenly being. His ''Marriage of St. Catherine'' shows two angels in the lower left corner apparently disputing a book of scripture—vying with Catherine’s mystical ceremony for the viewer’s attention.  
 
In his ''Annunciation'', for example, the Virgin Mary is greeted by a beautiful, shimmering-robed [[Archangel Gabriel]], while her dog trots out to investigate the heavenly being. His ''Marriage of St. Catherine'' shows two angels in the lower left corner apparently disputing a book of scripture—vying with Catherine’s mystical ceremony for the viewer’s attention.  
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[[Category:Heavenly beings]]
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[[Category:Embodiments of ascended masters]]

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