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== Hegel’s theory of dialectic ==
 
== Hegel’s theory of dialectic ==
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Hegel believed that what makes the universe intelligible is the understanding of it as an eternal cycle wherein [[Spirit]] comes to know itself as Spirit. This Spirit knowing of itself as Spirit comes through logic, though nature, and through mind-Spirit or ''Geist''.<ref>Hegel used the word ''Geist'' to describe a central principle of his philosophy. The word is the etymological origin of the word ''ghost'', but this term has lost much of its original meaning in English. Analogous words in other languages are the Greek ''pneuma'', Latin ''spiritus'', and Sanskrit ''prana''. One element of the breadth of the original meaning in English is found in the term ''Holy Ghost''. ''Geist'' can be translated as “consciousness,” mind or Spirit. Hegel’s use of this term is indicative of his departure from atheistic rationalism.</ref> He saw logic as positive pure Spirit. He saw nature as the negative creation of Spirit which bears the mark of its creator, in other words, [[Matter]]. He saw Spirit coming to know Spirit through Alpha, through Omega, through the masculine and feminine polarity of the universe; and then through ''Geist'', through self-consciousness, self-expression in history, self-discovery in art, religion and philosophy. That ''Geist'', then, becomes the individual [[Christ Self]] positioned in the midst of the Spirit-Matter being which you are, here and now.
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Hegel believed that what makes the universe intelligible is the understanding of it as an eternal cycle wherein [[Spirit]] comes to know itself as Spirit. This Spirit knowing of itself as Spirit comes through logic, though nature, and through mind-Spirit or ''Geist''.<ref>Hegel used the word ''Geist'' to describe a central principle of his philosophy. The word is the etymological origin of the word ''ghost'', but this term has lost much of its original meaning in English. Analogous words in other languages are the Greek ''pneuma'', Latin ''spiritus'', and Sanskrit ''[[prana]]''. One element of the breadth of the original meaning in English is found in the term ''Holy Ghost''. ''Geist'' can be translated as “consciousness,” mind or Spirit. Hegel’s use of this term is indicative of his departure from atheistic rationalism.</ref> He saw logic as positive pure Spirit. He saw nature as the negative creation of Spirit which bears the mark of its creator, in other words, [[Matter]]. He saw Spirit coming to know Spirit through Alpha, through Omega, through the masculine and feminine polarity of the universe; and then through ''Geist'', through self-consciousness, self-expression in history, self-discovery in art, religion and philosophy. That ''Geist'', then, becomes the individual [[Christ Self]] positioned in the midst of the Spirit-Matter being which you are, here and now.
    
Hegel believed that thinking always proceeded according to the dialectic pattern. An initial positive thesis is immediately negated by its antithesis. Further thought produces a synthesis, which again produces an antithesis. The process continues, but not indefinitely, for it is circular. The culmination is the absolute, the return of thought to Source or to Spirit.
 
Hegel believed that thinking always proceeded according to the dialectic pattern. An initial positive thesis is immediately negated by its antithesis. Further thought produces a synthesis, which again produces an antithesis. The process continues, but not indefinitely, for it is circular. The culmination is the absolute, the return of thought to Source or to Spirit.
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Under the first, the means of production are socially owned. Under the second, the slave owner owns them. Under the third, the feudal lord partially owns them while his men have some property. Under the fourth, the capitalist owns the means of production, but not his men. He can no longer dispose of his workers as he pleases, though they are compelled to work for him. Under the fifth, which has not yet come into existence, the workers themselves will own the means of production, and with the abolition of the contradictions inherent in capitalism, production will reach its fullest development. From the point of view of both production and freedom, each of these stages represents an advance upon its predecessor, in accordance with the dialectic principle that every new stage takes up whatever was of value in that which it has negated.  
 
Under the first, the means of production are socially owned. Under the second, the slave owner owns them. Under the third, the feudal lord partially owns them while his men have some property. Under the fourth, the capitalist owns the means of production, but not his men. He can no longer dispose of his workers as he pleases, though they are compelled to work for him. Under the fifth, which has not yet come into existence, the workers themselves will own the means of production, and with the abolition of the contradictions inherent in capitalism, production will reach its fullest development. From the point of view of both production and freedom, each of these stages represents an advance upon its predecessor, in accordance with the dialectic principle that every new stage takes up whatever was of value in that which it has negated.  
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Marx saw the separate stages of social progress each represented by a social class: feudalism by the nobility; capitalism by entrepreneurs, which he called the “bourgeoisie”<ref>''Bourgeoisie'' is a French word originally referring to dwellers in a city, as opposed to the peasants who dwelt in rural areas. It was later used as a legal term for those who had rights of citizenship and political rights in a city. These were often merchants, craftsmen and business owners. The revolutions of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the ascendance of the bourgeoisie over the nobility who had ruled in earlier centuries. Marx had great disdain for the bourgeoisie, and the word has come to be used as a pejorative description for the middle class.</ref>; socialism by the workers, the proletariat.<ref>''Proletariat'': (French) from the Latin ''proletarius'',  “producers of offspring.” The term was used in ancient Rome to refer to poor freedmen, including artisans and small tradesmen, the lowest rank among Roman citizens, whose primary contribution to the state were their offspring (''proles''). In Marxist philosophy the term is used to refer to those who do not own capital or the means of production and who earn their living by selling their labor.</ref> Marx maintained that the victory of the new class cannot be limited by a democracy which substitutes ballots for bullets and requires respect for inalienable rights.  
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Marx saw the separate stages of social progress each represented by a social class: feudalism by the nobility; capitalism by entrepreneurs, which he called the “bourgeoisie”<ref>''Bourgeoisie'' is a French word originally referring to dwellers in a city, as opposed to the peasants who dwelt in rural areas. It was later used as a legal term for those who had rights of citizenship and political rights in a city. These were often merchants, craftsmen and business owners. The revolutions of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the ascendance of the bourgeoisie over the nobility who had ruled in earlier centuries. Marx had great disdain for the bourgeoisie, and the word has come to be used as a pejorative description for the middle class.</ref>; socialism by the workers, the proletariat.<ref>''Proletariat'': (French) from the Latin ''proletarius'',  “producers of offspring.” The term was used in ancient Rome to refer to poor freedmen, including artisans and small tradesmen, the lowest rank among Roman citizens, whose primary contribution to the state were their offspring (''proles''). In Marxist philosophy the term is used to refer to those who do not own capital or the means of production and who earn their living by selling their labor.</ref> Marx maintained that the victory of the new class cannot be limited by a [[democracy]] which substitutes ballots for bullets and requires respect for inalienable rights.  
    
In the class struggle which Marx witnessed following the Industrial Revolution, he professed extreme sympathy for the injured and the insulted laboring masses. This sympathy for the downtrodden characterizes this entire philosophy. It originates in the sympathy of the Devil for himself: “Feel sorry for me. I have gotten kicked out of heaven. God has denied me his light, his bread, his energy, his consciousness; now give me what God has failed to give me.”
 
In the class struggle which Marx witnessed following the Industrial Revolution, he professed extreme sympathy for the injured and the insulted laboring masses. This sympathy for the downtrodden characterizes this entire philosophy. It originates in the sympathy of the Devil for himself: “Feel sorry for me. I have gotten kicked out of heaven. God has denied me his light, his bread, his energy, his consciousness; now give me what God has failed to give me.”
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The First Cause, which is God’s karma (the ''ca''use of the ''r''ay in ''ma''nifestation) is the descent of the soul with free will. Under that First Cause, obedient to that will, imbued with that wisdom, filled with that Holy-Spirit love, we can manifest God-mastery. Disobedient to it, entering the ignore-ance of the Law and the anti-love synthesis, we set up secondary causes.
 
The First Cause, which is God’s karma (the ''ca''use of the ''r''ay in ''ma''nifestation) is the descent of the soul with free will. Under that First Cause, obedient to that will, imbued with that wisdom, filled with that Holy-Spirit love, we can manifest God-mastery. Disobedient to it, entering the ignore-ance of the Law and the anti-love synthesis, we set up secondary causes.
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Secondary causes are temporarily real. They are real because we sustain them by free will, but they are unreal in the absolute sense and therefore we do not give them power, wisdom or love. We do not feed them energy. We cut them from the vine of life and we put them into the fiery furnace where the tares belong.  
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Secondary causes are temporarily real. They are real because we sustain them by free will, but they are unreal in the absolute sense and therefore we do not give them [[Power, wisdom and love|power, wisdom or love]]. We do not feed them energy. We cut them from the vine of life and we put them into the fiery furnace where the tares belong.  
    
What is true of the individual is true of civilization. There is First Cause: [[Golden age|golden-age civilizations]], golden-age God-government and economy. There are secondary cause-effect sequences: the karma of society and civilization that is not founded upon the Rock of Christ.
 
What is true of the individual is true of civilization. There is First Cause: [[Golden age|golden-age civilizations]], golden-age God-government and economy. There are secondary cause-effect sequences: the karma of society and civilization that is not founded upon the Rock of Christ.
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The law of karma that we have set in motion has no inevitable conclusion, but only the perpetual process of resolution by the law of love and its transmutative sacred fire. The agents of this transmutation are always the Word made flesh and the fiery baptism of the Holy Ghost. This process continues until the Absolute is attained, that is, until the soul’s liberation from all cause-effect sequences—dialectic, didactic or materialistic—through integration with the Law of the One or the [[I AM THAT I AM]].
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The law of karma that we have set in motion has no inevitable conclusion, but only the perpetual process of resolution by the law of love and its transmutative sacred fire. The agents of this transmutation are always the Word made flesh and the fiery baptism of the Holy Ghost. This process continues until the Absolute is attained, that is, until the soul’s liberation from all cause-effect sequences—dialectic, didactic or materialistic—through integration with the [[Law of the One]] or the [[I AM THAT I AM]].
    
== Saint Germain’s commentary on Marxist philosophy ==
 
== Saint Germain’s commentary on Marxist philosophy ==

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